“Switch it off and switch it back on again”

I don’t know about you, but whenever my computer is playing up I’ll spend several frustrating minutes trying to figure out why and fix the problem (which, given my limited knowledge of IT, is unlikely at the best of times). Then I’ll try everyone’s favourite method of switching it off and switching it on again – and voila! It’s amazing how often it kicks back into life like nothing has happened.

You’ll have also heard people say that the brain is like a computer. So what happens if you put those two ideas together?

Like most people, I’ve taken a break over the summer, but this year I’ve done things a little differently.

In the past, even if I went on holiday, I’d take some work with me. If nothing else, while everyone else was eagerly reading the latest pool-side best-seller, I’d read a couple of books on management and leadership before letting myself read for fun.

This year, however, for a full week I consciously chose NOT to think about anything work related. I did this to the extent that if work-related thoughts crept into my mind, I’d consciously switch them off and think about or do something else.

Here are five of the most productive and useful things to have come out of that experiment.

 

1. Guilt lessens as you realise the value of switching off

Many people feel guilty about taking time out and simply allowing themselves to switch off – the self employed in particular, where there’s no one else to take up the slack if you take a break.

However, if you’ve set yourself a clear time frame for switching off, for example “this week, I’m not thinking about anything work related at all”, you’ll feel less guilty in the knowledge that you WILL be tackling these issues in good time. Just not now.

If you start to stress that you’ll forget something important, write it down somewhere, and then put it aside.

Trust me: the world won’t stop if you do.

 

2. You’ll get things into perspective

It’s all too easy to get bogged down in day-to-day matters which do have to be addressed, but which, if you give them too much attention as and when they arise, take up far too much of your focus and time.

I, for one, am often guilty of dealing with things immediately as they arise, in effect treating everything as an emergency and running the risk of faffing about with the small things rather than concentrating on the things that really matter.

Allowing yourself to switch off and, as it were, view some of these things with detachment, gives you a different, clearer perspective on what actually matters.

 

3. You’ll learn new things and make fresh connections

When you deliberately step away from your work you’ll find yourselves doing other things – things that engage and interest you. Even though you’ve deliberately ‘switched off’ from work, you’re not wasting time doing nothing.

Allowing yourself to focus on other things provides valuable opportunities to learn new things which can in the long term prove MUCH more useful than if you’d tried to stay half tuned-in to work.

I’ve been doing a bit of research on creativity and innovation, and one of the most useful things I’ve done in recent months is wander round a few art galleries. Not only was it a relaxing thing to do, it provided food for thought, and I met one or two interesting people who have provided me with valuable insights as to how the artistic process relates to innovation.

 

4. Subconscious works

In essence, when you deliberately switch off from work-related issues, you allow your subconscious to take over and figure it all out for you.

The power of your subconscious is not to be underestimated: it can and will draw upon hidden strengths and forgotten knowledge in order to solve problems, generate new ideas and so on … but it can’t work effectively if your conscious mind is constantly over-riding it. Switching off provides the opportunity for it to work for you. 

My personal example of this relates to a training workshop I’d been asked to develop and deliver at short notice. Instead of fretting in front of the computer screen trying to dredge ideas up from nowhere, I went for a run.

By the time I came back an hour later, I had a clear idea of the content and structure of the workshop, and even some of the props and visuals I was going to use.

There’s no way I’d have come up with the same quality of ideas if I’d tried to force them: it was a case of deliberately doing something else and letting my subconscious do the work.

 

5. When you switch on again

This, my friends, came as perhaps the biggest surprise of all, and is perhaps the most important point: if you take time to switch off, when you switch on again and tune back in to work, you’ll find that during the time you’ve switched off, something has happened.

You’re better able to focus, you have better ideas and you’re more motivated – not in spite of, but BECAUSE you’ve switched off and switched on again.

 

So here’s the thing. Take time to switch off: you don’t have to go on holiday, you can take a ten minute breather. It’s counter intuitive, but sometimes switching off rather than ploughing on can be the most productive thing to do.

 

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One Response to ““Switch it off and switch it back on again””

  1. susangrandfield Says:

    Great advice here Anna. I often find, when I don’t take time to switch off, that I end up running on autopilot for most of my day. Doing lots of “stuff” but not really achieving anything significant. The value of taking time out of your normal routine is not to be under-estimated!

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